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IM Hamburg

Ironman Hamburg 2024 (June 2nd) – Seedings

2023 Hamburg.Looking Back To What Occurred Last Year

With Ironman Hamburg coming up in 2024, I can’t help but to think back to the accident that happened last year and to the motorbike driver who died while following the race. If you want to refresh your memory, I refer you back to Tim Heming’s in-depth look for Triathlete Magazine and a closer look at how I experienced last year’s race.

Following the accident, Ironman has made a number of changes to make a similar accident much less likely, among them

  • reduction of the number of press motorbike on the course
  • more scrutiny and better education of motorbike drivers
  • course changes to avoid traffic going in both directions

Some of these changes were already implemented in the races immediately after IM Hamburg last year (e.g. at Ironman Frankfurt), and some more will be visible this year. For example, a new bike course was only announced four weeks before the race and is apparently not without its own challenges – see this German article by triathlon Magazine. Another issue that is making me a bit uneasy: A few of the early Ironman Pro Series events had huge Pro fields, leading to a lot of athletes in close proximity. For example, the startlist for 70.3 Oceanside had 80 men and 37 women. This potentially makes drafting again a much bigger issue, and it also creates problems for the fairness and integrity of the female Pro race when a small gap between the starts makes the fastest women overtake many Pro men already in the swim. Hopefully, this concern is unlikely to be a factor in this year’s women’s Pro European Championship as no Pro men are racing in Hamburg and the startlist only has 30 females.

I hope that the changes that have been implemented will help to create a safe and fair race in Hamburg 2024!

Previous Winners

Year Male Winner Time Female Winner Time
2017 James Cunnama (ZAF) 08:00:36 Daniela Bleymehl (GER) 09:07:49
2018 Bart Aernouts (BEL) 07:05:26 Sarah Crowley (AUS) 08:08:21
2019 Kristian Hogenhaug (DEN) 08:11:26 Susie Cheetham (GBR) 08:58:02
2021     Laura Zimmermann (GER) 08:54:30
2022     Laura Philipp (GER) 08:18:20
2023 Denis Chevrot (FRA) 07:26:20    

Last Race’s TOP 3

Male Race Results (2023)

Rank Name Nation Swim Bike Run Time
1 Denis Chevrot FRA 00:46:40 04:01:37 02:31:38 07:26:20
2 Pieter Heemeryck BEL 00:46:43 04:00:24 02:37:36 07:31:00
3 Kristian Hogenhaug DEN 00:46:46 03:57:00 02:40:01 07:31:11

Female Race Results (2022)

Rank Name Nation Swim Bike Run Time
1 Laura Philipp GER 00:54:38 04:31:14 02:45:38 08:18:20
2 Chelsea Sodaro USA 00:54:38 04:35:09 03:00:20 08:36:41
3 Manon Genet FRA 00:54:40 04:47:52 03:02:43 08:52:01

Course Records

Leg Gender Record Athlete Date
Total overall 08:00:36 James Cunnama 2017-08-13
Swim overall 00:47:38 Carlos Lopez Diaz 2017-08-13
Bike overall 04:17:29 Kristian Hogenhaug 2019-07-28
Run overall 02:40:58 James Cunnama 2017-08-13
Total female 08:18:20 Laura Philipp 2022-06-05
Swim female 00:47:45 Lauren Brandon 2021-08-29
Bike female 04:31:14 Laura Philipp 2022-06-05
Run female 02:45:38 Laura Philipp 2022-06-05

Course Rating

The Course Rating for IM Hamburg is 17:29.

Race Adjustments for IM Hamburg

Year Adjustment Swim Adj. Bike Adj. Run Adj. # of Finishers Rating Swim Rating Bike Rating Run Rating
2017 05:17 00:18 00:45 04:54 18 of 20 05:17 -00:21 00:45 04:54
2019 07:49 -02:09 09:50 00:31 21 of 35 06:33 -01:27 05:18 02:42
2021 18:21 01:12 14:51 03:31 10 of 13 10:29 -00:58 08:29 02:59
2022 23:58 00:54 17:43 05:49 10 of 12 13:52 -00:37 10:47 03:41
2023 31:57 01:28 24:22 07:19 36 of 43 17:29 -00:26 13:30 04:25

Nice slots and Prize Money

IM Hamburg has 6 Pro Nice slot(s). It has a total prize purse of 87.500 US$, paying 10 deep.

Female Race Participants

The strength of the field is 20% of a typical Kona field.

# Bib Name Nat Expected Rating ESwim EBike ET2 ERun Consistency
1 1 Katrina Matthews (KQ) GBR 08:34:04 08:50:15 00:55:02 04:42:09 05:42:11 02:51:53 78% +0% -22% (8)
2 2 Fenella Langridge (KQ) GBR 08:45:09 09:04:33 00:50:56 04:42:15 05:38:12 03:06:57 71% +8% -21% (9)
3 4 Maja Stage Nielsen (KQ) DEN 08:49:33 09:08:49 00:54:56 04:46:08 05:46:04 03:03:29 80% +11% -8% (17)
4 3 Daniela Bleymehl GER 08:52:21 09:21:17 00:58:42 04:37:41 05:41:23 03:10:58 26% +4% -70% (22)
5 9 Els Visser (KQ) NED 08:54:22 09:11:52 00:58:11 04:43:40 05:46:51 03:07:31 91% +9% -0% (15)
6 8 Laura Jansen * GER 08:56:11 09:22:29 00:59:12 04:49:56 05:54:08 03:02:03 59% +0% -41% (3)
7 7 Sara Svensk SWE 08:57:13 09:14:35 00:58:56 04:41:23 05:45:20 03:11:53 27% +14% -59% (11)
8 25 Katrine Graesboell Christensen DEN 09:01:33 09:22:57 01:03:49 04:54:45 06:03:35 02:57:58 100% +0% -0% (4)
9 20 Henrike Gueber GER 09:01:41 09:39:39 01:05:00 04:48:11 05:58:11 03:03:30 33% +0% -67% (3)
10 31 Erin Schenkels (KQ) CAN 09:02:53 09:35:52 01:00:59 04:54:28 06:00:28 03:02:25 44% +56% -0% (4)
11 21 Dimity-Lee Duke AUS 09:11:39 09:39:58 01:00:14 04:58:40 06:03:54 03:07:45 43% +1% -56% (23)
12 13 Alexandra Tondeur BEL 09:12:01 09:34:46 00:59:39 05:01:41 06:06:19 03:05:42 37% +2% -61% (14)
13 12 Carolin Lehrieder GER 09:12:34 09:57:20 00:56:08 04:45:26 05:46:34 03:26:00 13% +5% -83% (24)
14 5 Joanna Ryter SUI 09:12:56 09:37:09 01:05:43 05:03:10 06:13:52 02:59:04 69% +4% -27% (14)
15 14 Kristin Liepold GER 09:13:12 09:35:27 01:08:07 04:59:18 06:12:26 03:00:46 83% +15% -2% (34)
16 10 Elisabetta Curridori ITA 09:14:02 09:37:45 00:57:37 04:59:10 06:01:47 03:12:15 45% +0% -55% (6)
17 17 Katharina Wolff GER 09:16:06 09:51:56 00:59:10 05:01:07 06:05:17 03:10:49 35% +22% -43% (7)
18 15 Margrit Elfers * GER 09:26:36 09:55:48 01:01:22 04:50:34 05:56:56 03:29:40 38% +18% -45% (8)
19 6 Jackie Hering USA 09:27:35 09:51:33 00:56:14 05:13:21 06:14:35 03:13:00 64% +16% -20% (15)
20 22 Line Borsinski DEN 09:34:11 10:08:21 01:03:33 05:00:39 06:09:13 03:24:58 42% +0% -58% (4)
21 16 Rebecca Anderbury GBR 09:41:02 10:30:55 01:05:29 04:50:15 06:00:44 03:40:18 48% +52% -0% (2)
22 29 Cathrine Sand DEN 09:43:01 10:10:57 01:01:41 05:05:57 06:12:38 03:30:23 100% +0% -0% (4)
23 28 Hannah Arlom GER 09:46:22 10:21:14 01:02:11 05:09:06 06:16:17 03:30:05 n/a (1 IM Pro race)
24 30 Sabrina Exenberger * AUT 09:52:27 10:22:40 01:12:20 05:07:17 06:24:37 03:27:50 100% +0% -0% (2)
25 23 Fabia Maramotti ITA 10:12:53 10:49:21 00:55:04 05:03:59 06:04:02 04:08:51 n/a (1 IM Pro race)
26 27 Annika Timm GER 10:17:53 10:48:49 01:11:40 05:06:48 06:23:28 03:54:25 35% +0% -65% (4)
27 19 Maria Florencia Diaz Philippi ESP 10:18:22 10:55:09 01:11:24 05:34:16 06:50:40 03:27:42 n/a (1 IM Pro race)
  11 Julie Iemmolo FRA n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  18 Stephanie Wunderle GER n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  24 Lisa Gerss GER n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  26 Sabrina Roth GER n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)

Note: Athletes with a ‘*’ are also registered for another race within 8 days.

Winning Odds

Female Race Participants

  • Katrina Matthews: 57% (1-1)
  • Fenella Langridge: 14% (6-1)
  • Maja Stage Nielsen: 10% (9-1)
  • Els Visser: 8% (12-1)
  • Daniela Bleymehl: 5% (18-1)
  • Erin Schenkels: 2% (62-1)

Ironman Hamburg 2023 – Accident

It has taken me some time to sort through what happened at Ironman Hamburg on Sunday, June 4th, when an accident on the bike course lead to one dead person and two more getting injured (but not in critical condition). First of all, I am offering my deep condolences to the family and friends of the moto driver who lost his life in the collision, and I send my best wishes for a speedy and full recovery to the two others who were injured. I tried to keep this post short and to the point, but as you can imagine there are a lot of thoughts swirling around in my head. 

The first part of this post looks at how I was following the race and how the accident occurred from my perspective. (You can find some more perspectives in a Triathlete Magazine post written by Tim Heming: What Happened in The Fatal Crash At Ironman Hamburg.) These first two sections are as factual as possible for me this shortly after the accident, mainly to report the accident and its circumstances for those who have followed the race through the Ironman live stream which almost completely ignored the accident. (This post won’t discuss the train wreck of deleting comments inquiring about what had happened and eventually even completely shutting down comments, and my horror about continuing as if nothing has happened – this has already been covered by others.)

Then I give you my opinion on whether the race should have been stopped, and I finally look at some of the issues to consider to increase the safety and fairness of future races for all participants. My main goal behind the last section is to do my little part to start a discussion that is obviously needed to move our sport forward.

How I Followed the Race

I was working for German television who were showing the race via a live stream on their main sports website and also providing updates and summaries for linear television (such as news and their regular sports program “Sportschau”). My role is called “Commentary Assistant” which means that I was giving data updates to the commentary team and helping the producers with information about race development. It means that I have a similar view to the producers with screens for all cameras and recordings (which may include replays of race scenes to preview before deciding if they go on air). Here’s a view of this “control room” the day before the race:

HH Studio

During the race, I was seeing the accident through screens which was bad enough. It must have been way harder for those who were there on-site, and my thoughts are with them as well.

How the Accident Occurred

The bike course at Ironman Hamburg is a two-loop course with a shorter section through downtown and then a long out-and-back along the river Elbe. The major part of the out-and-back goes southeast for about 25k (so about 50k of the 90k loop) on the road next to the dike, mostly in a rural area. The road is two tight lanes with very few side roads. Once the lead athletes have turned around at the far end (roughly 55k into the loop), there are athletes going in both directions. The course map below shows the rough location of the accident, with the Pros going already North (blue arrow) towards transition and agegroupers still going south:

AccidentLocation

At the time of the accident there were 6 to 9 athletes in the lead group, accompanied by maybe 10 to 12 motos. Here is a screenshot from the live stream shortly before the accident, showing the direction of the Pros (blue arrow) on one side and the age groupers (red arrow) on the other side of the road:

MotosAccident

The accident occurred when a moto was trying to overtake the line of motos who were already riding in the middle of the road. In order to do that, he had to move into the other lane, and he collided head-on with an oncoming agegrouper. Whether that was a human error or caused by a medical issue remains under investigation. The agegrouper and his bike were thrown past the other moto and into the lane the Pros were just riding in, and the accident could easily have been even worse if he had hit a motorcycle or one of the Pros. 

Emergency personnel were quickly on-site and tried to revive the motorcycle driver, but eventually he had to be pronounced dead. The agegrouper and the photographer on the back of the moto were brought to nearby hospitals and as far as I know have not sustained life-threatening injuries.

Reports from people who were just behind the big group of motos indicate that the emergency response was quick, professional and focused on the injured. Some of them stopped and helped to slow down the strings of athletes going in both directions who had to pass with meters of medicals trying to save lives. When a medical helicopter landed, the road was closed completely. From then on, in order to pass the accident site, athletes were forced to dismount their bikes and walk them up the embankment.

UntitledImage

Apparently a plan to shorten the bike course was also discussed, requiring a new turnaround before the accident site but not implemented. (I have no information if this plan was rejected or if its implementation wasn’t possible.)

Should the Race have been Stopped?

Even before the accident, I had serious doubts that the Pro race was fair. The number of motos with the lead group and the draft they created for the athletes must have made it significantly easier for them to ride fast than for others who had to ride alone, creating an unfair advantage for them. (At 55k, the gap of the first group had grown to more than four minutes.) Also, it made it harder (or even impossible) to ride away from the front group, creating a severe disadvantage for the stronger riders in that group. In an interview after the race, Frodo called it a “farce”.

The accident itself also had different implications for the Pros: The lead group heard the accident happen, most had to swerve around the agegrouper and his bike who ended up in their lane. Athletes further behind had to either slow down to pass the accident site on the road or push their bikes past the accident site on the embankment. 

In the second bike loop, the leaders of the Pro race also had to walk their bikes in order to pass the accident. To me, that was “one thing too much” to still care about the outcome of the race, and I believe that the Pro race for a European title, Nizza slots and prize money should have been stopped, e.g. when athletes got back into T2.

I appreciate that the situation might be different for age groupers focused on finishing, maybe letting them continue without officially timing them. The way the race was continued on Sunday, athletes were forced to ride towards a closed road and then had to walk their bikes within meters of an active accident site with ongoing first aid measures. I find it hard to believe that Ironman either thought this was acceptable or that they were not able to implement a better plan.

Increasing the Safety and Fairness of Future Races

In recent years there were a lot of other races (Frankfurt 2021 is just one example of many) which were heavily criticized for the number of motos with the lead group. This has a huge impact on how the race develops: Riding with the motos makes it easier to ride fast, makes it harder to make up time to the leaders if you have to close a gap after the swim and makes it harder (or even impossible) for strong bike riders to ride away from others in that front group.

But Hamburg 2023 was much worse: The situation had moved from “unfair” to “plainly dangerous”. Even before the accident, there were several tight squeezes where motos were way too close to athletes. 

I compare this to a Jenga tower: For some time, you can remove blocks and the tower remains standing. But at some point, remove one additional block and the tower collapses. For a long time, “blocks have been removed”, making the race more and more risky:

  • more athletes, sometimes making it impossible not to draft (i.e. at least 10 meters apart),
  • more motos on the course,
  • multiple loop courses (meaning that Pros in their second loop have to overtake agegroupers in their first loop),
  • courses with out-and-backs (i.e. traffic going in both directions),
  • courses with smaller roads
  • closer races with tighter and bigger groups
  • (I’m sure there are a lot of other factors that could be added.)

In Hamburg, so many blocks had been removed from the Jenga Safety tower that one extra error created the accident. 

Probably athletes complaining about an unfair or unsafe race is a good “early warning indicator” that something is off. We should encourage athletes (esp. Pro athletes) to speak up when they feel things are dangerous or unfair, instead of painting them as “sore losers”. Tim Heming’s article mentioned above has statements from Renee Kiley who raced as a female Pro in Hamburg 2022, and other athletes I have spoken with voiced similar concerns. This year’s men’s race only escalated these problems: While all the Pro women were on their own coming out of T1 in 2022, there were 9 men within 18 seconds at 55k in 2023. (The top 9 women in 2022 were 21 MINUTES apart at that point.)

As a sport, we have to do much better than in Hamburg 2023. Change is sorely needed, now more than ever. If the tragic accident in Hamburg isn’t enough to kick everyone into action, I don’t know what is. Some races have already considered or even announced changes earlier in the year, e.g. Challenge Roth severely reducing the number of motos on their course for this year’s race on June 25th. Some athletes such as Patrick Lange have started to share their ideas on what could be done. I hope that Ironman can take a few first steps for Ironman Frankfurt on July 2nd. I’ll keep an eye on changes in these and other races. But most measures are likely taking some more time to be developed and then implemented. A lot of open discussion of ideas is needed to make progress, and I hope that Ironman is willing to bring their experience in running big events to the discussion. For my part, I’m ready to help where I can and where my input is welcome. I sincerely hope that all involved parties will come together to work towards increased safety and fairness at future races.

Ironman Hamburg 2023 (June 4th) – Seedings

2023 HamburgPrevious Winners

Year Male Winner Time Female Winner Time
2017 James Cunnama (ZAF) 08:00:36 Daniela Bleymehl (GER) 09:07:49
2018 Bart Aernouts (BEL) 07:05:26 Sarah Crowley (AUS) 08:08:21
2019 Kristian Hogenhaug (DEN) 08:11:26 Susie Cheetham (GBR) 08:58:02
2021     Laura Zimmermann (GER) 08:54:30
2022     Laura Philipp (GER) 08:18:20

Last Race’s TOP 3

Female Race Results

Rank Name Nation Swim Bike Run Time
1 Laura Philipp GER 00:54:38 04:31:14 02:45:38 08:18:20
2 Chelsea Sodaro USA 00:54:38 04:35:09 03:00:20 08:36:41
3 Manon Genet FRA 00:54:40 04:47:52 03:02:43 08:52:01

Course Records

Leg Gender Record Athlete Date
Total overall 08:00:36 James Cunnama 2017-08-13
Swim overall 00:47:38 Carlos Lopez Diaz 2017-08-13
Bike overall 04:17:29 Kristian Hogenhaug 2019-07-28
Run overall 02:40:58 James Cunnama 2017-08-13
Total female 08:18:20 Laura Philipp 2022-06-05
Swim female 00:47:45 Lauren Brandon 2021-08-29
Bike female 04:31:14 Laura Philipp 2022-06-05
Run female 02:45:38 Laura Philipp 2022-06-05

Course Rating

The Course Rating for IM Hamburg is 13:52.

Race Adjustments for IM Hamburg

Year Adjustment Swim Adj. Bike Adj. Run Adj. # of Finishers Rating Swim Rating Bike Rating Run Rating
2019 07:49 -02:09 09:50 00:31 21 of 35 06:33 -01:27 05:18 02:42
2021 18:21 01:12 14:51 03:31 10 of 13 10:29 -00:58 08:29 02:59
2022 23:58 00:54 17:43 05:49 10 of 12 13:52 -00:37 10:47 03:41

Kona slots and Prize Money

IM Hamburg has 5 Pro Kona slot(s). It has a total prize purse of 75.000 US$, paying 10 deep.

Male Race Participants

The strength of the field is 26% of a typical Kona field.

# Bib Name Nat Expected Rating ESwim EBike ET2 ERun Consistency
1 2 Jan Frodeno (AQ) GER 07:47:56 07:57:46 00:46:56 04:15:16 05:07:11 02:40:45 55% +3% -42% (14)
2 5 Alistair Brownlee GBR 07:50:17 08:03:02 00:46:56 04:18:03 05:10:00 02:40:17 83% +17% -0% (3)
3 1 Denis Chevrot (KQ) FRA 07:51:57 08:03:51 00:48:12 04:19:07 05:12:20 02:39:37 67% +17% -15% (26)
4 8 Florian Angert GER 07:53:24 08:03:57 00:47:48 04:13:19 05:06:07 02:47:17 100% +0% -0% (6)
5 6 Matt Hanson (KQ) USA 07:56:19 08:14:09 00:51:18 04:20:41 05:16:58 02:39:21 67% +5% -28% (23)
6 16 Franz Loeschke GER 07:59:04 08:09:46 00:49:22 04:20:21 05:14:43 02:44:21 89% +0% -11% (5)
7 4 Kristian Hogenhaug (KQ) DEN 07:59:55 08:12:50 00:49:37 04:12:29 05:07:06 02:52:49 78% +7% -14% (17)
8 18 Dominik Sowieja GER 08:00:28 08:20:02 00:52:20 04:19:46 05:17:06 02:43:22 74% +26% -0% (4)
9 11 Robert Kallin SWE 08:00:31 08:13:52 00:48:51 04:07:00 05:00:51 02:59:40 42% +30% -28% (4)
10 9 Pieter Heemeryck BEL 08:02:47 08:30:49 00:48:04 04:20:34 05:13:38 02:49:09 20% +23% -57% (9)
11 14 William Mennesson FRA 08:03:51 08:29:07 00:51:48 04:15:58 05:12:45 02:51:06 37% +0% -63% (5)
12 12 Arnaud Guilloux (KQ) FRA 08:05:48 08:27:11 00:49:33 04:18:39 05:13:12 02:52:36 38% +43% -20% (11)
13 15 Jesper Svensson SWE 08:06:50 08:18:16 00:48:04 04:19:37 05:12:41 02:54:09 56% +8% -36% (14)
14 10 Josh Amberger AUS 08:09:14 08:21:21 00:47:13 04:22:08 05:14:21 02:54:53 90% +1% -8% (14)
15 21 David Plese SLO 08:10:00 08:22:30 00:51:21 04:23:47 05:20:08 02:49:52 80% +1% -19% (41)
16 17 Pamphiel Pareyn BEL 08:10:05 08:32:41 00:48:13 04:24:23 05:17:36 02:52:29 65% +35% -0% (6)
17 20 Kristian Grue NOR 08:11:26 08:37:05 00:54:03 04:23:02 05:22:05 02:49:21 n/a (1 IM Pro race)
18 52 Tomasz Szala POL 08:12:10 08:32:41 00:52:01 04:23:45 05:20:46 02:51:24 100% +0% -0% (2)
19 32 Andrej Vistica CRO 08:14:11 08:32:51 00:57:20 04:26:08 05:28:28 02:45:43 68% +9% -23% (29)
20 19 Dylan Magnien FRA 08:14:15 08:33:05 00:49:54 04:31:21 05:26:16 02:47:59 59% +0% -41% (3)
21 22 Thomas Davis GBR 08:15:49 08:38:05 00:48:46 04:30:12 05:23:58 02:51:51 46% +22% -32% (8)
22 28 Tobias Drachler GER 08:20:59 08:35:04 00:49:57 04:35:37 05:30:33 02:50:26 79% +10% -11% (5)
23 24 Sebastian Norberg SWE 08:22:11 08:42:00 00:57:11 04:28:02 05:30:13 02:51:58 61% +33% -6% (9)
24 42 Milosz Sowinski POL 08:22:17 08:51:20 00:51:09 04:27:05 05:23:15 02:59:02 28% +0% -72% (7)
25 40 Fabian Guenther GER 08:23:36 08:44:42 00:53:04 04:27:25 05:25:29 02:58:07 100% +0% -0% (2)
26 36 Kristian Hindkjaer DEN 08:25:30 08:45:26 00:50:37 04:25:23 05:21:00 03:04:30 46% +8% -45% (12)
27 37 Sven Wies GER 08:26:35 08:58:44 00:49:49 04:27:18 05:22:08 03:04:27 31% +42% -28% (3)
28 38 Sebastian Najmowicz POL 08:26:56 08:49:51 00:49:23 04:38:40 05:33:03 02:53:53 55% +0% -45% (5)
29 45 Lukas Schnoedewind GER 08:29:43 08:51:53 00:48:58 04:28:38 05:22:35 03:07:08 100% +0% -0% (2)
30 50 Nico Markgraf GER 08:32:32 08:59:17 00:50:13 04:33:59 05:29:12 03:03:20 n/a (1 IM Pro race)
31 43 Maximilian Rohde GER 08:33:57 09:06:10 00:55:13 04:27:33 05:27:46 03:06:11 41% +0% -59% (2)
32 44 Michael Raelert GER 08:37:56 08:55:49 00:46:49 04:41:18 05:33:07 03:04:49 45% +0% -55% (6)
33 48 Christopher Wehrle GER 08:38:17 09:05:20 00:54:31 04:36:31 05:36:02 03:02:15 n/a (1 IM Pro race)
34 35 Sam Proctor GBR 08:38:42 09:02:49 00:50:56 04:38:00 05:33:56 03:04:46 26% +0% -74% (4)
35 46 Christopher Dels GER 08:40:59 09:05:45 00:56:12 04:37:40 05:38:53 03:02:06 69% +0% -31% (4)
36 25 Levi Hauwert AUS 08:43:04 09:10:58 00:54:36 04:41:48 05:41:23 03:01:41 47% +30% -23% (4)
37 33 Julian Fritzenschaft GER 08:46:43 09:14:13 00:53:19 04:37:10 05:35:29 03:11:14 n/a (1 IM Pro race)
38 23 Shen-Yen Hsieh TWN 09:04:16 09:31:46 00:51:03 04:42:28 05:38:30 03:25:46 52% +0% -48% (4)
39 31 Alvaro Navalpotro Rodriguez ESP 09:11:17 09:40:04 00:53:20 04:51:24 05:49:44 03:21:33 n/a (1 IM Pro race)
  26 Timo Schaffeld GER n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  27 Remi Conte FRA n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  29 Dennis Ljung SWE n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  30 Vincent Terrier FRA n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (1 IM Pro race)
  34 Jan Hoeing GER n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  39 James Scott-Farrington GBR n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  41 Kevin Vabaorg EST n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (1 IM Pro race)
  47 Leonard Arnold GER n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  49 Finn Große-Freese GER n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  51 Marc Eggeling GER n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)

Winning Odds

Male Race Participants

  • Jan Frodeno: 31% (2-1)
  • Alistair Brownlee: 27% (3-1)
  • Max Neumann: 24% (3-1)
  • Denis Chevrot: 7% (14-1)
  • Kristian Hogenhaug: 6% (15-1)

Ironman Hamburg 2022 – Analyzing Results

HamburgCourse Conditions

Once again, IM Hamburg was a fast race. Conditions were perfect for racing – almost no wind and sunny weather. Laura Philipp took full advantage, posting a new bike, run and overall course record. She also set a new fastest German time (improving on Anne Haug’s time from Copenhagen 2018). She missed Chrissie Wellington’s fastest Iron-distance time (set at Challenge Roth in 2011) by only 7 seconds! I will have to do a bit of updating to my IM Records page soon!

Kona Qualifying

As the European Regional Championships, IM Hamburg offered the female Kona slots.

These will go to:

  • Chelsea Sodaro
  • Manon Genet
    and
  • Heini Hartikainen

Race winner Laura Philipp was already qualified. You can find all Kona qualifiers here.

Female Race Results

Rank Name Nation Swim Bike Run Time Diff to exp. Prize Money
1 Laura Philipp GER 00:54:38 04:31:14 02:45:38 08:18:20 -09:18 US$ 25,000
2 Chelsea Sodaro USA 00:54:38 04:35:09 03:00:20 08:36:41 n/a US$ 15,000
3 Manon Genet FRA 00:54:40 04:47:52 03:02:43 08:52:01 -13:52 US$ 9,000
4 Heini Hartikainen FIN 01:02:14 04:44:35 03:02:01 08:56:31 -15:29 US$ 7,500
5 Chantal Sainter GBR 00:54:40 04:49:56 03:10:42 09:01:49 -14:18 US$ 5,500
6 Verena Walter GER 01:02:14 04:51:08 03:31:24 09:33:08 15:38 US$ 4,000
7 Jenny Nae SWE 01:04:26 05:12:15 03:08:49 09:34:11 03:40 US$ 3,000
8 Janien Lubben NED 01:09:49 05:05:45 03:16:57 09:41:11 -16:29 US$ 2,500
9 Karina Gosvig DEN 00:58:45 05:04:47 03:33:54 09:45:50 n/a US$ 2,000
10 Annika Timm GER 01:11:02 05:04:01 03:58:16 10:21:26 23:17 US$ 1,500
  Renee Kiley AUS 00:58:47     DNF    
  Vanessa Pereira POR 01:04:30     DNF    

Ironman Hamburg 2022 (June 5th) – Seedings

HamburgUpdates:

  • June 3rd: A few more athletes haven’t signed in at the Pro briefing and are unlikely to race. I have crossed out Leanne Fanoy, Jenny Schulz, Palmira Alvarez, Margrit Elfers and Annika Timm. Based on this update, 12 female Pros will be starting the race on Sunday.
  • June 1st: Based on the latest startlist from Ironman, I have crossed out Carolin Lehrieder and Anna-Lena Best-Pohl. I have also crossed out Daniela Bleymehl and Nikki Bartlett who have told me that they’ll be racing IM Frankfurt instead.

Previous Winners

Year Male Winner Time Female Winner Time
2017 James Cunnama (ZAF) 08:00:36 Daniela Bleymehl (GER) 09:07:49
2018 Bart Aernouts (BEL) 07:05:26 Sarah Crowley (AUS) 08:08:21
2019 Kristian Hogenhaug (DEN) 08:11:26 Susie Cheetham (GBR) 08:58:02
2021     Laura Zimmermann (GER) 08:54:30

Last Race’s TOP 3

Female Race Results (2021)

Rank Name Nation Swim Bike Run Time
1 Laura Zimmermann GER 00:59:51 04:42:05 03:05:42 08:54:30
2 Renee Kiley AUS 00:56:11 04:39:48 03:12:42 08:56:47
3 Lauren Brandon USA 00:47:45 04:44:41 03:20:35 09:00:49

Male Race Results (2019)

Rank Name Nation Swim Bike Run Time
1 Kristian Hogenhaug DEN 00:52:03 04:17:29 02:54:03 08:11:26
2 Ruedi Wild SUI 00:50:13 04:24:16 02:55:37 08:16:34
3 Paul Schuster GER 00:50:05 04:25:32 03:02:37 08:24:25

Course Records

Leg Gender Record Athlete Date
Total overall 08:00:36 James Cunnama 2017-08-13
Swim overall 00:47:38 Carlos Lopez Diaz 2017-08-13
Bike overall 04:17:29 Kristian Hogenhaug 2019-07-28
Run overall 02:40:58 James Cunnama 2017-08-13
Total female 08:54:30 Laura Zimmermann 2021-08-29
Swim female 00:47:45 Lauren Brandon 2021-08-29
Bike female 04:39:48 Renee Kiley 2021-08-29
Run female 02:56:21 Sarah Piampiano 2019-07-28

Course Rating

The Course Rating for IM Hamburg is 10:29.

Race Adjustments for IM Hamburg

Year Adjustment Swim Adj. Bike Adj. Run Adj. # of Finishers Rating Swim Rating Bike Rating Run Rating
2017 05:17 -00:21 00:45 04:54 18 of 20 05:17 -00:21 00:45 04:54
2019 07:49 -02:09 09:50 00:31 21 of 35 06:33 -01:27 05:18 02:42
2021 18:21 01:12 14:51 03:31 10 of 13 10:29 -00:58 08:29 02:59

Kona slots and Prize Money

IM Hamburg has 3 Pro Kona slot(s). It has a total prize purse of 75.000 US$, paying 10 deep.

Female Race Participants

The strength of the field is 15% of a typical Kona field.

# Bib Name Nat Expected Rating ESwim EBike ET2 ERun Consistency
1 1 Laura Philipp (KQ) GER 08:41:18 08:49:46 00:56:11 04:49:38 05:50:49 02:50:29 100% +0% -0% (4)
2 2 Daniela Bleymehl (KQ) GER 08:58:29 09:10:56 00:57:10 04:44:57 05:47:08 03:11:21 47% +32% -21% (16)
3 5 Manon Genet FRA 09:05:52 09:29:31 00:57:13 04:53:19 05:55:31 03:10:21 11% +36% -53% (10)
4 8 Leanne Fanoy * UAE 09:08:55 09:42:46 01:01:51 05:00:18 06:07:09 03:01:46 28% +72% -0% (2)
5 11 Anna-Lena Best-Pohl GER 09:12:26 09:37:36 00:54:38 05:03:57 06:03:35 03:08:51 52% +0% -48% (2)
6 7 Renee Kiley (KQ) AUS 09:15:11 09:36:59 00:57:55 04:51:47 05:54:42 03:20:29 46% +20% -34% (14)
7 6 Carolin Lehrieder GER 09:16:33 09:36:33 00:56:55 04:48:22 05:50:17 03:26:16 33% +13% -54% (20)
8 4 Nikki Bartlett (KQ) GBR 09:18:55 09:28:59 00:59:10 04:59:25 06:03:35 03:15:20 91% +7% -3% (11)
9 15 Jenny Schulz GER 09:19:54 09:47:37 01:03:43 05:05:13 06:13:56 03:05:58 12% +42% -46% (7)
10 9 Heini Hartikainen FIN 09:24:27 09:41:35 01:04:15 04:55:24 06:04:39 03:19:48 29% +51% -20% (4)
11 12 Verena Walter GER 09:29:33 09:42:57 01:01:24 05:01:43 06:08:07 03:21:26 53% +27% -20% (14)
12 10 Chantal Sainter GBR 09:30:53 09:45:59 00:57:25 05:06:30 06:08:56 03:21:57 100% +0% -0% (3)
13 17 Palmira Alvarez MEX 09:39:01 10:03:22 01:07:47 05:06:19 06:19:06 03:19:55 52% +36% -13% (15)
14 22 Jenny Nae SWE 09:40:48 10:01:59 01:06:11 05:11:35 06:22:46 03:18:02 100% +0% -0% (5)
15 14 Margrit Elfers GER 09:47:12 10:13:55 01:02:52 04:52:02 05:59:53 03:47:19 54% +0% -46% (2)
16 18 Vanessa Pereira * POR 09:55:44 10:15:15 01:05:55 05:19:59 06:30:53 03:24:51 57% +28% -15% (20)
17 19 Janien Lubben NED 10:08:11 10:29:43 01:10:28 05:15:49 06:31:17 03:36:54 49% +51% -0% (5)
18 16 Annika Timm GER 10:19:19 10:44:42 01:11:46 05:11:14 06:28:00 03:51:19 56% +0% -44% (3)
  3 Chelsea Sodaro USA n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  20 Karina Gosvig DEN n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  21 Emma Cowper GBR n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)

Note: Athletes with a ‘*’ are also registered for another race within 8 days.

Winning Odds

Female Race Participants

  • Laura Philipp: 68% (1-1)
  • Daniela Bleymehl: 20% (4-1)
  • Manon Genet: 5% (18-1)
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