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Ironman New Zealand 2023 (March 4th) – Seedings

IRONMAN NewZealand logo Nutri Grain largePrevious Winners

Year Male Winner Time Female Winner Time
1999 Timothy DeBoom (USA) 08:32:41 Melissa Spooner (CAN) 09:20:14
2000 Thomas Hellriegel (GER) 08:22:46 Lisa Bentley (CAN) 09:28:14
2001 Cameron Brown (NZL) 08:24:28 Lisa Bentley (CAN) 09:36:17
2002 Cameron Brown (NZL) 08:32:54 Karyn Ballance (NZL) 09:27:33
2003 Cameron Brown (NZL) 08:22:05 Joanna Lawn (NZL) 09:17:56
2004 Cameron Brown (NZL) 08:30:30 Joanna Lawn (NZL) 09:22:24
2005 Cameron Brown (NZL) 08:20:15 Joanna Lawn (NZL) 09:30:14
2006 Ain-Alar Juhanson (EST) 03:31:05 Joanna Lawn (NZL) 04:10:32
2007 Cameron Brown (NZL) 08:26:33 Joanna Lawn (NZL) 09:20:02
2008 Cameron Brown (NZL) 08:24:49 Joanna Lawn (NZL) 09:16:00
2009 Cameron Brown (NZL) 08:18:05 Gina Crawford (NZL) 09:18:26
2010 Cameron Brown (NZL) 08:21:52 Joanna Lawn (NZL) 09:14:35
2011 Cameron Brown (NZL) 08:31:07 Samantha Warriner (NZL) 09:28:24
2012 Marino Vanhoenacker (BEL) 03:55:03 Meredith Kessler (USA) 04:22:46
2013 Bevan Docherty (NZL) 08:15:35 Meredith Kessler (USA) 09:17:10
2014 Marko Albert (EST) 08:17:33 Meredith Kessler (USA) 09:08:46
2015 Cameron Brown (NZL) 08:22:13 Meredith Kessler (USA) 09:05:45
2016 Cameron Brown (NZL) 08:07:58 Meredith Kessler (USA) 08:56:08
2017 Braden Currie (NZL) 08:20:58 Jocelyn McCauley (USA) 09:09:47
2018 Terenzo Bozzone (NZL) 07:59:56 Laura Siddall (GBR) 09:00:44
2019 Mike Phillips (NZL) 08:05:08 Jocelyn McCauley (USA) 08:53:10
2020 Joe Skipper (GBR) 07:54:17 Teresa Adam (NZL) 08:40:29
2021 Braden Currie (NZL) 07:57:12 Hannah Berry (NZL) 09:01:49

Last Race’s TOP 3

Male Race Results

Rank Name Nation Swim Bike Run Time
1 Braden Currie NZL 00:47:29 04:23:46 02:40:46 07:57:12
2 Mike Phillips NZL 00:47:48 04:23:28 02:49:51 08:06:38
3 Kyle Smith NZL 00:46:32 04:23:48 02:51:39 08:08:53

Female Race Results

Rank Name Nation Swim Bike Run Time
1 Hannah Berry NZL 00:53:54 04:50:40 03:10:50 09:01:49
2 Rebecca Clarke NZL 00:48:38 05:02:08 03:17:40 09:15:38
3 Emily McNaughtan NZL 01:01:04 05:12:22 03:17:48 09:38:42

Course Records

Leg Gender Record Athlete Date
Total overall 07:54:17 Joe Skipper 2020-03-07
Swim overall 00:44:26 Dylan McNeice 2015-03-07
Bike overall 04:12:07 Andrew Starykowicz 2019-03-02
Run overall 02:40:04 Mike Phillips 2019-03-02
Total female 08:40:29 Teresa Adam 2020-03-07
Swim female 00:46:30 Monica Byrn 2005-05-03
Bike female 04:36:11 Teresa Adam 2020-03-07
Run female 02:55:34 Kristin Liepold 2019-03-02

Course Rating

The Course Rating for IM New Zealand is 08:00.

Race Adjustments for IM New Zealand

Year Adjustment Swim Adj. Bike Adj. Run Adj. # of Finishers Rating Swim Rating Bike Rating Run Rating
2005 31:31 00:28 -06:29 39:28 38 31:31 -01:28 -06:29 39:28
2007 13:54 01:31 05:44 05:53 24 22:43 00:29 -00:06 22:20
2008 11:35 02:08 05:10 04:09 36 19:00 01:06 01:41 16:14
2009 10:19 00:33 06:19 03:15 38 16:50 01:00 02:52 12:58
2010 09:23 01:37 03:24 04:18 22 15:21 01:09 02:58 11:14
2011 -04:07 00:50 -01:15 -03:11 24 12:06 01:00 02:16 08:50
2013 00:00 01:14 01:05 -01:50 24 10:22 00:58 02:05 07:19
2014 05:40 01:27 01:16 02:55 31 of 41 09:47 01:02 01:59 06:46
2015 05:53 01:32 01:24 03:24 22 of 27 09:21 01:03 01:55 06:24
2016 06:05 02:21 04:25 00:15 37 of 49 09:01 01:05 02:10 05:47
2017 -04:07 -02:45 -01:21 00:13 27 of 40 07:50 00:43 01:51 05:17
2018 09:43 01:15 06:59 02:12 28 of 34 07:59 00:42 02:16 05:01
2019 04:16 00:33 00:12 04:12 25 of 28 07:42 00:38 02:07 04:58
2020 08:51 00:24 08:11 00:53 27 of 30 07:47 00:34 02:33 04:40
2021 11:05 01:10 08:31 01:53 11 08:00 00:35 02:57 04:29

Kona slots and Prize Money

IM New Zealand has 2m+2f Pro Kona slot(s). It has a total prize purse of 100.000 US$, paying 10 deep.

Male Race Participants

The strength of the field is 13% of a typical Kona field.

# Bib Name Nat Expected Rating ESwim EBike ET2 ERun Consistency
1 1 Braden Currie NZL 07:59:16 08:11:11 00:46:47 04:26:34 05:18:20 02:40:56 67% +4% -29% (16)
2 2 Sebastian Kienle GER 08:00:47 08:08:37 00:51:00 04:16:48 05:12:48 02:47:59 76% +0% -24% (22)
3 6 Jan van Berkel (KQ) SUI 08:02:48 08:25:27 00:48:40 04:27:24 05:21:04 02:41:44 23% +36% -41% (25)
4 3 Mike Phillips NZL 08:07:58 08:22:39 00:47:38 04:29:10 05:21:47 02:46:11 64% +14% -21% (12)
5 5 Matt Burton AUS 08:10:35 08:25:54 00:51:24 04:24:19 05:20:42 02:49:53 15% +26% -59% (20)
6 4 Cameron Brown NZL 08:22:14 08:44:59 00:51:46 04:35:18 05:32:04 02:50:10 55% +1% -43% (60)
7 8 Simon Cochrane NZL 08:32:38 08:46:34 00:48:22 04:45:16 05:38:38 02:54:00 85% +8% -6% (28)
8 12 Levi Hauwert AUS 08:41:36 09:12:49 00:53:01 04:43:49 05:41:49 02:59:47 21% +44% -35% (3)
9 10 Lucas Duross NZL 08:53:24 09:09:45 00:55:13 04:55:58 05:56:11 02:57:13 100% +0% -0% (2)
10 9 Jason Christie NZL 09:39:01 10:02:31 01:07:36 04:50:17 06:02:53 03:36:08 n/a (1 IM Pro race)
  7 Matt Kerr NZL n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  11 Scott Harpham NZL n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)
  14 Michael Tong NZL n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)

Female Race Participants

The strength of the field is 5% of a typical Kona field.

# Bib Name Nat Expected Rating ESwim EBike ET2 ERun Consistency
1 23 Els Visser (KQ) NED 09:04:56 09:11:22 00:57:29 04:59:03 06:01:32 03:03:24 62% +38% -0% (9)
2 24 Meredith Kessler USA 09:05:35 09:28:20 00:51:15 05:03:00 05:59:16 03:06:19 47% +11% -42% (37)
3 21 Hannah Berry NZL 09:07:13 09:26:43 00:53:50 04:59:02 05:57:52 03:09:21 100% +0% -0% (2)
4 22 Rebecca Clarke NZL 09:12:39 09:26:01 00:49:12 05:04:15 05:58:26 03:14:13 63% +31% -5% (7)
5 27 Ai Ueda JPN 09:42:13 09:55:52 00:57:34 05:32:45 06:35:19 03:06:54 100% +0% -0% (3)
6 26 Laura Armstrong NZL 09:45:01 10:08:46 00:57:57 05:22:23 06:25:20 03:19:41 n/a (1 IM Pro race)
7 25 Jenny Fletcher CAN 10:28:42 10:42:56 01:00:10 05:33:24 06:38:34 03:50:08 55% +0% -45% (6)
  28 Laura Wood NZL n/a unrated unrated unrated unrated unrated n/a (no IM Pro race)

Winning Odds

Male Race Participants

  • Braden Currie: 41% (1-1)
  • Jan van Berkel: 30% (2-1)
  • Sebastian Kienle: 16% (5-1)
  • Mike Phillips: 8% (11-1)
  • Matt Burton: 4% (22-1)

Female Race Participants

  • Els Visser: 33% (2-1)
  • Hannah Berry: 29% (2-1)
  • Meredith Kessler: 23% (3-1)
  • Rebecca Clarke: 14% (6-1)

Kona 2022 – How the Male Race Unfolded

Here are the results of the top finishers and the athletes who had an influence on the outcome of the MPRO race (full results can be found here, there’s also a detailed look at the women’s Pro race):

Rank Name Nation Swim Bike Run Time Diff to exp. Prize Money
1 Gustav Iden NOR 00:48:22 (9) 04:11:05 (6) 02:36:14 (1) 07:40:23 -04:26 US$ 125,000
2 Sam Laidlow FRA 00:48:15 (2) 04:04:35 (1) 02:44:39 (5) 07:42:23 -33:03 US$ 65,000
3 Kristian Blummenfelt NOR 00:48:19 (5) 04:11:15 (8) 02:39:20 (2) 07:43:22 -06:43 US$ 45,000
4 Max Neumann AUS 00:48:24 (12) 04:11:29 (9) 02:40:13 (3) 07:44:43 -20:09 US$ 25,000
5 Joe Skipper GBR 00:52:54 (44) 04:11:10 (7) 02:45:25 (6) 07:54:04 -12:55 US$ 20,000
6 Sebastian Kienle GER 00:52:57 (46) 04:09:10 (4) 02:48:44 (13) 07:55:39 -14:34 US$ 18,000
7 Leon Chevalier FRA 00:52:53 (43) 04:09:04 (3) 02:49:27 (15) 07:55:51 -17:23 US$ 15,000
8 Magnus Elbaek Ditlev DEN 00:49:48 (29) 04:13:37 (11) 02:48:10 (11) 07:56:37 02:12 US$ 13,000
9 Clement Mignon FRA 00:49:49 (30) 04:15:13 (14) 02:45:59 (8) 07:56:57 -06:15 US$ 12,000
10 Patrick Lange GER 00:49:41 (23) 04:21:51 (22) 02:41:58 (4) 07:58:19 00:41 US$ 11,000
11 Cameron Wurf AUS 00:52:50 (42) 04:09:03 (2) 02:54:26 (18) 08:00:50 -15:20 US$ 8,000
12 Florian Angert GER 00:48:14 (1) 04:17:57 (19) 02:50:28 (16) 08:01:52 -01:39 US$ 6,000
13 Timothy O’Donnell USA 00:48:22 (9) 04:13:29 (10) 02:56:02 (19) 08:02:57 -13:51 US$ 5,000

Here’s the Race Development Graph for these athletes (click for a hi-res version):

Men

Here is a quick summery of the race for the podium spots:

  • There was a big group of about 20 athletes at the front of the swim. Florian Angert was first out of the water but fell back on the bike with a penalty.
  • Max Neumann and Sam Laidlow took the lead on the bike, by the turn in Hawi they were joined by Kristian Blummenfelt, Gustav Iden and Magnus Ditlev.
  • Sam built a huge lead of more than six minutes in the second half of the bike, posting a new bike course record.
  • Magnus also fell out of contention when he had to serve a draft penalty shortly before T2. Max was running well, but he wasn’t quite able to hold on to the Norwegians but was able to finish fourth with a new Australian fastest Ironman.
  • Gustav and Kristian ran together for the first 17 miles, closing the gap to Sam to about three minutes. Then Gustav pushed the pace even more, was able to overtake Sam and take the win with new overall and run course records.
  • Sam was able to hold on to second place, while Kristian finished third just one minute behind.

Kona Champion: Gustav Iden

After two 70.3 titles, Gustav also became the Kona 2022 Champion:

M1 Gustav

The day started well for Gustav when he was able to stay in the first swim group – he started the bike with all of the favorites, just a few seconds off the lead. With Max and Sam pushing the pace at the front, he settled into the chase group, and by the turn in Hawi he had worked his way back to the lead group without having to work too hard. When Sam pushed the pace on the return leg to Kona, he continued to ride with Kristian, Magnus and Max – none of whom seemed to be too keen to exert much energy to keep Sam in sight. In T2, he and the rest of the group were more than six minutes behind Sam. He and Kristian dropped Max after 5 miles and went to work to reel in Sam, but the gap was still around three minutes at the turn in the Energy Lab, about 10k from the finish. After climbing back out of Energy Lab, Gustav decided to go all in: He dropped Kristian and the gap to Sam started to shrink quickly. Shortly after mile 22, Gustav was able to take the lead from Sam, and Sam was not able to stay with him. In the end, he won with a margin of two minutes, setting a new Kona course record (improving Jan Frodeno’s 2019 time by almost 11 minutes) and also a new run course record with a 2:36 marathon.

Second Place: Sam Laidlow

After a courageous race which included a new bike CR and a new personal marathon PR, Sam finished second:

M2 Sam

For most of the race, Sam was pushing the pace at the front. After a swim with the lead group, he quickly rode away from the others, bridging up to Max Neumann and then riding about one minute ahead of all the chasers. From that chase group, only three managed to ride up to them in the climb to Hawi, but after the turn Sam upped the pace again and no one was able to ride with him. On the way back to Kona he built a gap of more than six minutes. He also improved Cam Wurf’s 2018 bike course record by almost five minutes. Still, it was expected that the Norwegians would be able to quickly reel him – in St. George it took Kristian about ten miles to close the T2 gap of 4:30 to Sam. Sam ran way faster than his 2:55 marathon pace from St. George, and still had a three minute lead in the Energy Lab. Would we get a new youngest male Kona winner? (Sam was 23 for the Kona 2022 race, the youngest male winner is Scott Tinley who was 25 when he won in February 1982.) It took a big push by Gustav Iden to catch Sam at mile 22, but with his 2:44 marathon he was able to hold on to his second place.

Third Place: Kristian Blummenfelt

After becoming the St. George Champion, Kristian took third place in Kona:

M3 Kristian

For most of the day, Kristian was within seconds of eventual winner Gustav Iden. On the run, he and Gustav were able to shrink the gap to leader Sam Laidlow, but at about mile 20 it became apparent that something special would be needed to catch Sam. Some statements from Gustav after the race seemed to indicate that Kristian wasn’t able to push the pace as much as needed. To put this in the proper perspective, Kristian ran a 2:39:20 marathon, the second fastest ever run split in Kona! Nonetheless, after winning in St. George with a 2:38 it was a disappointment for Kristian to “only” finish in third place.

Fourth Place: Max Neuman

Another big surprise was the fourth place finish by Max:

M4 Max

Max was also part of the big first swim group, but he continued to push an aggressive pace on the bike. After he was joined by Sam Laidlow, they created a gap of about a minute to the chase group that didn’t change much until the climb to Hawi. At the turn, Max was part of the lead group of five athletes. When Sam took off at the front, Max continued to ride with Kristian, Gustav and Magnus and started the run in fourth place. On Ali’i he ran with the two Norwegians but then had to slowly let them go after about five miles. But he was able to build a big gap to anyone behind him, what was initially two minutes in T2 became four minutes at mile 10 (to Leon Chevalier) and more than five minutes at mile 16, the turn in the Energy Lab (to Magnus Ditlev). With a 2:40:13 Max posted the third fastest marathon of the day and finished in fourth place, only 1:21 behind Kristian. His 7:44 was also the new fastest Ironman finish by an Australian athlete.

Fifth Place: Joe Skipper

After a 7th place in 2018 and a 6th in 2019, Joe improved another spot with his fifth place in 2022:

M5 Joe

Joe is the top finisher of anyone who was not able to swim with the first group. He started the bike in 43rd place and settled down in the second chase group, about five minutes behind the front. The gap didn’t change much in the first half, but he slowly improved his position, by the turn in Hawi he had moved to 15th. When Cam Wurf increased the pace in the second group, he fell out of that group and rode the last 30 miles on his own. He lost maybe two minutes to them, also improving his position to 12th. Once on the run, he continued to move forward, he overtook everyone who rode away from him on the bike, finishing in fifth place. He improved his Kona marathon PR by eight minutes, only the Top4 and Patrick Lange (who came from further behind) ran faster than his 2:45 marathon.

Sixth Place: Sebastian Kienle

In his final Kona race, Sebi was this year’s top German male in sixth place:

M6 Sebi

Sebi’s swim was about as expected – he started the bike in position 45, about five minutes behind the big lead group. Right after T1, it was “decision time”: Others such as Cam Wurf or Joe Skipper pushed the pace a bit more than he expected, and he had to go harder than planned to ride his way back up to them. In the climb to Hawi was another tricky moment when they passed a group of athletes falling back from the first chase group and Sebi almost lost other strong riders in the confusion. But he was able to stay with Cam and reached T2 in a promising seventh place. His run pace was also solid, and after a battle with Magnus Ditlev a fifth place finish seemed possible before he was caught by Joe Skipper. A solid 2:48 saw him finish in sixth place as the oldest athlete in the Top 10. His total time of 7:55 was his fastest Kona finish ever – a very respectable endpoint to his Kona racing.

Seventh Place: Leon Chevalier

After his sixth place in St. George, Leon finished seventh in Kona:

M7 Leon

For most of the first two legs, Leon was close to Sebi. He was five minutes behind the leaders in T1, then rode with Cam and Sebi. But he was given a one-minute penalty (he was told it was for dropping a bottle outside of a litter zone) and served his penalty at the same time that Flo and Clement were serving their five minutes. Luckily, he could leave about a minute before them and was able to catch back up to the Wurf/Kienle group within the next 15 miles and even lead them around the turn in Hawi. He put in another effort in the climb back to the Queen K shortly before mile 80, forcing another few athletes such as Joe Skipper to drop from the group. After hitting T2 in seventh place 8:40 behind the leaders, he was the fastest runner of the group on Ali’i Drive, running in fifth and hoping for some of the athletes in front of him to run into problems. But on the rollers on the Queen K out to the Energy Lab, he was the one who started to fall off his pace. At mile 23 he had dropped back to ninth place but then was able to surge again and climb back into seventh place.

Eighth Place: Magnus Ditlev

Even with a frustrating penalty, Magnus finished his first Ironman World Championship in eighth place:

M8 Magnus

As is typical for him, Magnus lost some time in the swim. In Kona, he was 1:58 behind the leaders – almost the same time he was behind Jan Frodeno in Roth (1:50). Once on the bike, he wasted no time to bridge up to the chase group with Kristian and Gustav, and then continued to push the pace to ride up to the leaders Sam and Max. (A lot of athletes not shown in the graph – such as Sam Appleton, Kristian Hoegenhaug, Daniel Baeekegard or Rudy Von Berg –  were not able to hold onto the pace at this point, and once out of the group they were quickly falling back to the second chase group or even further.) Magnus then was the first to reach the leaders, also building a gap of 30 seconds to Gustav and Kristian – which the Norwegians were able to close by the turn in Hawi. On the way back, Magnus was given a five-minute penalty for drafting – which he had to serve shortly before T2. So instead of starting the run “in the mix” with the Norwegians, he was 11th, almost eleven minutes behind Sam and also two minutes behind the second chase group with Sebi, Leon and Cam. He started the run with a good pace, passing all of this second chase group, and shortly after Palani Rd he was in fifth place, running with Sebi. He was able to build a small gap to Sebi – he left the Energy Lab (split at 19 miles) 14 seconds ahead. But then he started to struggle a bit, and after a roller-coaster of passes and re-passes in the final miles he finished in eighth place.

Ninth Place: Clement Mignon

As a Kona rookie Clement finished ninth and was also the third French athlete in the Top10:

M9 Clement

Clement swam with the second bigger group, roughly 30 seconds behind the big lead group. On the bike, he quickly worked his way into the chase group that had formed behind Max and Sam. However, he was given a penalty, and you could see him discuss what may have happened with Flo Angert in the penalty tent at mile 34. After they started rolling again, they stayed together for most of the bike, losing time to the front of the race but solid enough to gain a few spots – from 39th after the penalty to 13th before T2. Clement continued to gain places on the run, at mile 25 he had even worked his way into eighth place. He lost one spot practically in the finish chute, but a Top 10 finish in only his second Ironman is a great start to his long-distance racing.

Tenth Place: Patrick Lange

With Patrick in tenth place there is another athlete who had to mentally re-group after serving a penalty:

M10 Patrick

Patrick ended the swim at the back of the first big group – he was 27 seconds behind Flo Angert, but then lost some more time in T1 – he started the bike with a gap of 1:33 to the leader. That meant he wasn’t quite able to stay with the first bigger group, and he probably wasn’t willing to invest what would be needed to make up roughly a minute to strong riders such as Magnus, Kristian or Gustav. That meant that he and the group he was riding with fell back by mile 40 to the second chase group around Cam Wurf, about 4 minutes behind the leaders. Riding with Cam was a great strategy for Kristian Blummenfelt in St. George, and Patrick still seemed to be in a good position. But then he was also given a drafting penalty that he had to serve after the turn in Hawi and he fell back to 37th, more than ten minutes behind the leaders. He made up a few spots in the second half of the bike but lost some more time to the front – he started the run in 21st place, 18:37 behind the leaders. He also had a penalty in his first Kona in 2017 – there he ran onto the podium with a 2:39 marathon after being 22nd in T2 with a gap of 10:12. This year, he ran a fourth-best marathon of just under 2:42, which allowed him to claim the last Top10 spot.

Eleventh Place: Cameron Wurf

Cam is still among the strongest Ironman athletes on the bike, but he finished in eleventh place:

M11 Cam

For the last years, Cam has been the fastest cyclist at the Ironman World Championships. He set the Kona bike course record in 2018 (4:09:06), and he was even three seconds quicker this year. But the “talk of the town” was Sam Laidlow’s bike split of 4:04:35, and a few more athletes were only a few seconds slower than Cam. That meant Cam was “only” fifth at the start of the run (instead of leading as in 2018), and a podium finish seemed unlikely. Running on Ali’i he quickly lost a few positions, and even if his final marathon time of 2:54 is his new fastest Kona run, he finished just outside of the Top10 in eleventh place.

Twelfth Place: Florian Angert

An early penalty forced Florian to chase from behind, he finished twelfth:

M12 Florian

Flo had a great start to his race day, being first out of the water. He did not go with Max and Sam off the front, but was content to lead the chase group with Gustav and Kristian. When some more aggressive riders moved through the group, he was given a penalty and had to let the group go at the mile 34 penalty tent. He was calm enough (probably just on the outside) to give interviews while waiting, but his frustration about a penalty he didn’t understand came through. After the forced break, he had dropped to 38th place. There were a few athletes around him then, but most had their own set of issues and they lost more time to the torrid pace at the front. But even starting the run 13:40 behind the leader, he had moved into 16th place. He gained a few more spots during his 2:50 marathon, finishing in twelfth place, at least earning a bit of prize money.

Thirteenth Place: Timothy O’Donnell

For a long time, TO was in a great place, but he was not able to repeat his 2019 marathon and finished in thirteenth place:

M13 TO

TO also swam with the first group, then was riding in the chase group until about mile 40. When Magnus and the Norwegians pushed the pace to bridge up to the leaders, he and a few others were no longer able to follow. But he continued to ride at a decent pace, and it took the second chase around Cam Wurf until mile 90 to catch him. He started the run in eighth place and was even able to move up to sixth place in the first few miles. But after the turn on Ali’i, he slowly moved backwards in the field. In the end, his 2:56 marathon meant he finished thirteenth – even so the top US athlete in the men’s Pro field. This was the first time since 2011 that no US athlete was in the Top 10 (and only the third time ever).

Kona 2022 – How the Female Race Unfolded

Here are the results of the top finishers and the athletes who had an influence on the outcome of the WPRO race (full results can be found here, there’s also a detailed look at the men’s Pro race):

Rank Name Nation Swim Bike Run Time Diff to exp. Prize Money
1 Chelsea Sodaro USA 00:54:47 (10) 04:42:07 (4) 02:51:44 (1) 08:33:45 -29:04 US$ 125,000
2 Lucy Charles-Barclay GBR 00:50:56 (1) 04:43:11 (7) 03:02:48 (5) 08:41:36 -17:18 US$ 65,000
3 Anne Haug GER 00:57:57 (18) 04:41:48 (3) 02:57:56 (2) 08:42:21 -07:01 US$ 45,000
4 Laura Philipp GER 00:57:53 (15) 04:45:26 (11) 03:01:32 (4) 08:50:30 00:10 US$ 25,000
5 Lisa Norden SWE 00:54:41 (8) 04:42:24 (5) 03:12:40 (10) 08:54:42 -14:44 US$ 20,000
6 Fenella Langridge GBR 00:51:41 (4) 04:43:24 (8) 03:16:29 (13) 08:56:25 -11:35 US$ 18,000
7 Sarah Crowley AUS 00:54:49 (11) 04:55:02 (15) 03:06:55 (6) 09:01:57 -11:56 US$ 15,000
8 Daniela Ryf SUI 00:57:51 (14) 04:36:10 (1) 03:23:44 (24) 09:02:25 06:01 US$ 13,000
9 Skye Moench USA 00:54:51 (12) 04:44:35 (9) 03:19:37 (18) 09:04:30 -00:57 US$ 12,000
10 Laura Siddall GBR 00:58:08 (23) 04:46:57 (12) 03:17:33 (16) 09:07:48 -13:13 US$ 11,000
DNF Sara Svensk SWE 00:58:09 (24) 04:39:12 (2) DNF

Here’s the Race Development Graph for these athletes (click for a hi-res version):

Women

Here is a quick summery of the race for the podium spots:

  • Since 2017, Lucy Charles-Barclay has always been first out of the water, this year was no different.
  • However, she was quickly joined at the front by Fenella Langridge, and the two worked together for the whole bike leg.
  • Daniela Ryf had to put in a big effort to catch these two before the end of the bike. Daniela started the run in the lead but eventually finished eighth. Fenella also lost a few spots on the run, she finished sixth.
  • Kona rookie Chelsea Sodaro started the run three minutes behind the leaders, but she posted the fastest marathon (2:51) and won the 2022 race by almost eight minutes.
  • With a 3:02 marathon, Lucy posted her fastest Kona marathon so far, taking second place for the fourth time.
  • Defending Kona Champion Anne Haug started the run almost six minutes behind Daniela and quickly moved into the final podium position. However, she just wasn’t able to run up to Lucy, finishing third by just 45 seconds.

Kona Champion: Chelsea Sodaro

The surprise of the day was the performance of Kona rookie Chelsea Sodaro who stormed to the win:

F1 Chelsea

After the swim, Chelsea was about four minutes behind Lucy Charles. Chelsea established herself in the chase group, and the gap to Lucy stayed much the same into T2. The only athlete who was able to overtake her on the bike was Daniela, and she started the run in fourth place, only behind Daniela, Lucy and Fenella. At that point, she was seen as a solid Top10 candidate but what followed then was a surprise to almost everyone: Chelsea was the fastest runner and even took the lead after the aid station on the uphill at Palani Road. After her previous IM in Hamburg she said she had run out of energy in the second half of the marathon, and in the Kona aid stations she always took some extra time, walking a bit to take on extra water and ice. Was that a sign of struggles or just smart strategy in the Kona heat? At the turn in the Energy Lab, she had already built a lead of almost five minutes – an explosion seemed less and less likely. When she crossed the finish line, she won by almost eight minutes, running a 2:51 marathon, the fastest of the day by six minutes. She also posted the second-fastest time ever on the Kona course.

Second Place: Lucy Charles-Barclay

For the fourth time, second place went to Lucy Charles-Barclay:

F2 Lucy

The start (leading into T1) and the end of the race (finishing in second place) must have been familiar to Lucy. What was different to previous races is that she wasn’t able to build a big gap in the swim – she was only 44 seconds ahead of Rebecca Clarke (who finished 17th), Pamella Oliveira (DNF) and Fenella. Fenella then bridged up to Lucy in the first ten miles, and the two traded the lead on the bike. That situation only changed 4 miles before T2 when Daniela rode by them. But it was soon evident that Lucy was the fastest runner of the lead three, and she re-took the #1 spot soon after T2. She was able to hold on to the lead along the Queen K, but at the end of the climb on Palani Chelsea relegated her to second place and Lucy started to fall behind. Unless Chelsea would blow up, Lucy’s attention had to be behind her where Anne Haug was eating into the gap to Lucy. But even after Lucy’s injury at the start of the year, she was running well. Her 3:02 marathon was her fastest in Kona so far – quick enough to hold off Anne and to take second place.

Third Place: Anne Haug

The defending Champion from Kona 2019, Anne Haug, finished in third place:

F3 Anne

Compared to 2019, Anne lost slightly more time in the swim (6:41 in 2022 vs. 5:07) but then rode well in the second chase group with a number of strong bike riders such as Daniela Ryf. After the turn in Hawi, the gap was down to under four minutes but then Daniela rode away from the chase group who was no longer able to make up time to the lead. Even though she posted the second-fastest bike split of the finishers, in the final 90 minutes of the bike she was losing time to Lucy and the other leaders. Anne started the run in seventh place, 5:36 behind the lead. In 2019 she had made up more than eight minutes to Lucy (and won by six minutes!), this year Anne’s first half marathon also went well and she moved into third place by mile 10, but still four minutes behind the new leader Chelsea, and just over three minutes behind Lucy in second place. At mile 20, she was within 30 seconds to Lucy, but then the gap hovered between 21 and 36 seconds. Just as in St. George, Anne ran out of steam and was a bit frustrated to not to be able to close the gap. Her 2:57 marathon was the second-fastest (behind Chelsea) – but also Anne’s slowest World Championship marathon. At the finish line, she had to settle for third by just 45 seconds. This was the smallest gap between female second and third place finishers since the eight-second difference between Natascha Badmann and Nina Kraft in 2003. (The closest men’s gap is 16 seconds between Lionel Sanders and Braden Currie at St. George 2022.)

Fourth Place: Laura Philipp

Laura Philipp repeated her fourth place from 2019:

F4 Laura

This year’s race was a roller-coaster for Laura. It started well when she was able to swim with Daniela Ryf and Anne Haug in the second chase group and they were slowly making up time to the leaders. Around mile 25 she was given a drafting penalty – the circumstances are still unclear (and unlikely to ever be properly cleared up). She was in tears when she served her five-minute penalty at mile 34 and dropped back from a promising position with the race favorites to outside the Top 20, more than ten minutes behind the leaders. She managed to continue to ride well and by T2 had fought her way back into 11th place. In the first part of the run on Ali’i, she gained three more spots but there were big gaps in front of her. But she continued to run at about a 3-hour marathon pace, and the slower runners slowly came back to her. Running towards the turn in the Energy Lab, she was able to see fourth to seventh place in front of her, and she was able to catch all of them in the next half hour. With Anne almost eight minutes in front of her at mile 20, Laura had to settle for securing her fourth position.

Fifth Place: Lisa Norden

After finishing sixth in St. George, Lisa Norden was able to improve to fifth place even with a penalty:

F5 Lisa

Lisa exited the water in the first bigger chase group, starting the bike with Chelsea Sodaro, Sarah Crowley and Skye Moench. When they reached the climb to Hawi, only Lucy and Fenella were about three minutes ahead of them. Then Lisa was forced to serve a five-minute penalty right after the turn and dropped back to 12th place. After that she continued to ride strong, and she started the run in fourth place. In her past Ironman races, Lisa hadn’t been the strongest runner – in St. George she ran a 3:18 and fell back from third in T2 to sixth place. On Ali’i Drive, she dropped a few places into seventh. However, she was able to continue to run her pace and managed to gain back two more spots in the second half to finish with a new marathon PR of 3:12 in fifth place.

Sixth Place: Fenella Langridge

After finishing eighth in St: George, Fenella improved to sixth place in Kona:

F6 Fenella

Fenella had another great swim, only losing 30 seconds to Lucy. She was quickly able to bridge up to her in the out and back on Kuakini and was trading the lead with Lucy on the Queen K, the climb to Hawi and the way back into town. When Daniela passed them a few miles before T2, she continued to ride her own race, losing about a minute in the last 5k of the bike. When Chelsea ran by her on Ali’i, she continued to pace within herself, and that seemed a smart strategy: She was able to re-pass Daniela after Palani, and only the faster runners Anne and Laura were able to pass her in the next ten miles. Towards the end, Lisa Norden was running slightly quicker than her (3:12 marathon vs. 3:16 marathon), but sixth place was another step forward for Fenella.

Seventh Place: Sarah Crowley

After skipping St. George, Sarah’s return to the World Championships ended in seventh place:

F7 SarahC

When looking back, Sarah will probably be as frustrated as Laura about her race day – both met in the penalty box at mile 34. Sarah started the bike in the first bigger chase group with Chelsea and Lisa. The penalty must have hit her hard – just when she usually starts to make up time she was forced to wait five minutes in the penalty tent and then continued to lose time to the front and other contenders for the top spots. With other athletes struggling even more, she had moved into 13th place in T2 but nine minutes out of a Top 10 place. It took her only 10 miles to make up that time, and Sarah probably had been able to switch her mindset: In the last 10 miles she was able to gain another three spots, moving into seventh place practically in the finish chute.

Eighth Place: Daniela Ryf

Daniela worked hard for a better finish, but she had to settle for eighth place in the end:

F8 Dani

Daniela’s swim was about as expected: She started the bike 6:43 minutes behind the lead – maybe a bit more than usual (e.g. it was 4:22 in 2017), but she was part of the second chase group which started to eat into Lucy’s lead. But while she usually rode away from most of the group before the turn in Hawi (or in the first part of the bike as in St. George), she was still four minutes behind Lucy at 60 miles and hadn’t even caught the first chase group. At 70 miles, Daniela stepped up the pace, caught the chase group by mile 80 and then the leading duo of Lucy and Fenella by mile 110, shortly before T2. Would that be a repeat of 2017? In that race Dani needed a big bike effort to catch Lucy shortly before T2 but then was still able to post the fastest marathon of the day. This year, Dani quickly lost her lead and also a podium spot. In the second half she fell back even further, losing another spot in the finish chute. She had the fastest bike leg, but with a 3:23 marathon she only finished in eighth place.

Ninth Place: Skye Moench

After a fourth place in St. George, Skye finished in ninth place:

F9 Skye

For the first five hours, Skye’s Kona race looked like a repeat of St. George: She swam in the first chase group, then rode about three minutes behind the leaders. But then strong bike riders such as Daniela or Lisa stepped up the pace, and Skye started to fall back. She started the run in ninth place, and while she was able to overtake some struggling athletes some faster runners also were able to overtake her. At the finish line, a 3:19 marathon saw her finish in ninth place.

Tenth Place: Laura Siddall

With her seventh place from St. George, Laura’s tenth place meant two World Championship Top10s in 2022:

F10 Sid

After a solid swim in the second chase group (7:21 behind the leaders), Laura hardly lost any time to the front on the bike. She moved up from 25th in T1 to 12th in T2 and started the run 11:35 behind the leaders. She then also had a solid 3:17 marathon which was good enough to move into 10th place.

DNF: Sara Svensk

For a long time, Sara Svensk was in the Top10 spots, but then had to end her race about 5k from the finish line:

Fx Sara

Sara swam in the second chase group with Daniela and Anne. She was not able to follow Daniela on her push to the front but kept up the pace in the last 25 miles and was able to ride up to Chelsea and the first chase group, starting the run in sixth place. After Palani she started to lose time to the front. At the turn in Energy Lab she was still in eighth place. By mile 20 she was in trouble, and after quickly dropping to tenth place she wasn’t able to cross the finish line.

Deep Dive Into the 2022 Triathlon Money List

After 2020 saw a big dip in Professional triathlon racing and overall prize money, things have improved in 2021. The overall money has continued to increase in 2022, especially with the further increase in Pro prize money and two Ironman World Championships this season. This post looks at the overall trends and which athletes have been making good money in different categories.

If you want to check out the 2021 lists, you can find them in my post “Deep Dive Into 2021 Triathlon Money List“.

Money List – Overview

First, here is an overview of the races that are included in the money lists and comparisons to the 2022 and 2019 seasons. (I include 2019 as the last full season before the Corona pandemic disrupted racing.) The totals are shown in US$, for races that paid their prize purse in a different currency the amounts have been converted into US$.

Type Description Total Money
2022
Change
to 2019
Total Money
2021
Total Money
2019
# Pro Events
(2019)
Ironman WTC Ironman-branded races $ 3.338.400 + 35% $ 1.448.250 $ 2.467.000 27 (32)
70.3 WTC 70.3-branded races $ 1.566.100 – 27% $ 1.246.750 $ 2.152.750 42 (71)
PTO PTO races (incl. Bonus Pool) $ 5.563.000 + 45%* $ 3.690.503 (2020:
$ 3.846.316* )
4
(2020: 15*)
Challenge Challenge- and Clash-branded full and half-distance
races (incl. Bonus Pool)
$ 811.920 – 11% $ 843.516 $ 909.586 20 (27)
WTCS World Triathlon Championship Series (incl. Bonus Pool) $ 1.930.000 – 12% $ 1.650.000 $ 2.185.000 8 (9)
SuperLeague SuperLeague Professional Events $ 987.000 + 9% $ 814.500 $ 904.800 6 (4)
Other Independent Races (e.g Embrun, XTerra
World Championships, Alpe D’Huez)
$ 791.545 n/a $ 406.769 $ 624.877 24 (9)
Total $ 15.011.165   + 62% $ 10.580.288 $ 9.244.013
131 (152)

* comparisons for PTO are to 2020 (the first year they have been active), numbers not included in the 2019 totals

Some observations:

  • Ironman prize money is up compared to 2019 by 35%, but that is mostly due to two World Championship events in 2022, each paying US$ 750.000. Still, the average purse per event has gone up from 77k in 2019 to 124k in 2022.
  • Prize money for 70.3s is still down (-27%), mainly because of the reduced number of Pro events. The average purse has slightly increased from 30k to 37k per event.
  • As in previous years, PTO money continues to increase significantly (+57% compared to 2020). While in 2020 they also supported smaller, existing events to be able to provide a Pro prize purse, they are now focused on their own events and the yearly bonus. Each PTO event pays more than one million US$.
    (Note: An earlier version of this post showed a slightly higher total for the PTO – they have notified me of a small error that has now been corrected.)
  • Challenge money is also slightly down (-11%), and they have fewer events on their calendar. The average Challenge race pays just over 40k per event.
  • WTCS numbers are slightly down because there was one fewer event than in 2019. Not including their bonus payment of 750k, the average WTCS event pays 166k.
  • SuperLeague is another well-paying short-course series – they have slightly increased their money over 2019, paying 137k per event plus a series bonus. They also have “Arena Games” events and series with additional money (not included here).
  • The number of independent races that are included has increased significantly. Some of it has to do with events getting more visibility, but there are also a number of events that have increased their prize money to be included in the PTO World Rankings (minimum of US$ 10k prize purse), so this can also be partially attributed to the PTO.

Overall Money List

Kristian Blummenfelt is the overall leader in the 2022 Triathlon Money List, earning almost 500.000 US $ – more than twice the #1 from last year’s list. (Daniela Ryf made 244.000 in 2021.) Even though Daniela was able to increase her earnings this year to 335.00, she’s not even the top female athlete in 2022: Ashleigh Gentle earned just over 350.000 US$.

With the increased money from the PTO and more big events on the calendar, there were 33 athletes who were able to make more than $100.000 this year, compared to 23 in 2021 and 16 in 2019. There was a total of 762 athletes who were able to earn prize money in 2022, up from 647 athletes in 2021.

Kristian Blummenfelt Race 09

Photo: Kristian claims the #1 spot after the Collins Cup, provided by the PTO.

# Name Nation Sex Total Ironman 70.3 PTO Challenge WTCS SuperLeague Other
1 Kristian Blummenfelt NOR M $491,700 $170,000 $50,000 $260,000 $11,700
2 Gustav Iden NOR M $416,755 $125,000 $270,000 $18,255 $3,500
3 Ashleigh Gentle AUS F $351,368 $14,000 $325,000 $12,368
4 Daniela Ryf SUI F $335,000 $153,000 $2,000 $180,000
5 Anne Haug GER F $293,788 $90,000 $2,250 $180,000 $21,538
6 Magnus Elbaek Ditlev DEN M $293,038 $34,000 $18,000 $210,000 $31,038
7 Chelsea Sodaro USA F $278,250 $140,000 $3,250 $135,000
8 Georgia Taylor-Brown GBR F $273,000 $143,000 $130,000
9 Taylor Knibb USA F $270,600 $57,500 $140,000 $73,100
10 Hayden Wilde NZL M $255,000 $20,000 $105,000 $130,000
11 Sam Laidlow FRA M $250,000 $78,000 $172,000
12 Flora Duffy BMU F $227,400 $10,000 $60,000 $157,400
13 Paula Findlay CAN F $222,000 $41,000 $181,000
14 Laura Philipp GER F $216,500 $50,000 $6,500 $160,000
15 Lionel Sanders CAN M $207,750 $65,000 $10,750 $132,000
16 Lucy Charles-Barclay GBR F $198,250 $65,000 $12,000 $110,000 $11,250
17 Katrina Matthews GBR F $185,000 $65,000 $7,000 $113,000
18 Max Neumann AUS M $182,658 $57,500 $4,000 $120,000 $1,158
19 Sam Long USA M $169,410 $4,000 $10,000 $115,000 $40,410
20 Taylor Spivey USA F $162,200 $61,200 $101,000
21 Skye Moench USA F $158,000 $71,000 $1,000 $86,000
22 Patrick Lange GER M $152,519 $26,000 $115,000 $11,519
23 Leo Bergere FRA M $151,100 $3,000 $148,100
24 Collin Chartier USA M $148,500 $20,500 $128,000
25 Holly Lawrence GBR F $145,000 $20,000 $125,000
26 Matthew Hauser AUS M $140,400 $44,400 $96,000
27 Alex Yee GBR M $135,900 $125,900 $10,000
28 Braden Currie NZL M $125,877 $60,000 $63,000 $2,877
29 Daniel Baekkegard DEN M $122,000 $24,000 $14,000 $84,000
30 Matt Hanson USA M $120,056 $42,000 $12,500 $59,000 $6,556
31 Aaron Royle AUS M $115,259 $7,000 $104,000 $4,259
32 Jocelyn McCauley USA F $104,000 $21,000 $83,000
33 Sophie Coldwell GBR F $103,700 $32,700 $71,000
34 Lisa Norden SWE F $97,034 $45,000 $51,000 $1,034
35 Fenella Langridge GBR F $94,567 $31,000 $18,000 $45,567
36 Joe Skipper GBR M $92,500 $57,500 $35,000
37 Jackie Hering USA F $92,000 $22,000 $64,000 $6,000
38 Florian Angert GER M $91,034 $28,500 $1,500 $51,000 $1,034 $9,000
39 Beth Potter GBR F $87,400 $49,400 $38,000
40 Cassandre Beaugrand FRA F $86,800 $55,300 $31,500

PTO Events

For Ashleigh Gentle, 2022 was a breakthrough season on the longer distances. Winning both the Canadian and US Opens, she is the top PTO earner. All of the athletes in the table below made a significant part of their 2022 earnings from the PTO – the lowest is Kona Champion Chelsea Sodaro with “only” 49%. There were 206 athletes who earned PTO money in 2022.

Ashleigh Gentle US Open 2022 12

Photo: Ashleigh running to her second win on the PTO Tour in Dallas, provided by the PTO.

# Name Gender PTO Total Share
1 Ashleigh Gentle F $ 325.000 $ 351.368 92%
2 Gustav Iden M $ 270.000 $ 416.755 65%
3 Kristian Blummenfelt M $ 260.000 $ 491.700 53%
4 Magnus Elbaek Ditlev M $ 210.000 $ 293.038 72%
5 Paula Findlay F $ 181.000 $ 222.000 82%
6 Daniela Ryf F $ 180.000 $ 335.000 54%
6 Anne Haug F $ 180.000 $ 293.788 61%
8 Sam Laidlow M $ 172.000 $ 250.000 69%
9 Laura Philipp F $ 160.000 $ 216.500 74%
10 Taylor Knibb F $ 140.000 $ 270.600 52%
11 Chelsea Sodaro F $ 135.000 $ 278.250 49%
12 Lionel Sanders M $ 132.000 $ 207.750 64%
13 Collin Chartier M $ 128.000 $ 148.500 86%
14 Holly Lawrence F $ 125.000 $ 145.000 86%
15 Max Neumann M $ 120.000 $ 182.658 66%
16 Sam Long M $ 115.000 $ 169.410 68%
16 Patrick Lange M $ 115.000 $ 152.519 75%
18 Katrina Matthews F $ 113.000 $ 185.000 61%
19 Lucy Charles-Barclay F $ 110.000 $ 198.250 55%
20 Aaron Royle M $ 104.000 $ 115.259 90%
21 Skye Moench F $ 86.000 $ 158.000 54%
22 Daniel Baekkegard M $ 84.000 $ 122.000 69%
23 Jocelyn McCauley F $ 83.000 $ 104.000 80%
24 Ellie Salthouse F $ 66.000 $ 76.000 87%
25 Jackie Hering F $ 64.000 $ 92.000 70%

WTC Races

Kristian Blummenfelt was the most consistent racer on the longer distances. Winning two World Championship titles (both in St. George) and a third place in Kona was good enough to be the top earner from WTC races. He is followed by the other Ironman World Champions of this year, Daniela Ryf (St. George), Chelsea Sodaro (Kona) and Gustav Iden (Kona) – these four are also the only athletes at over 100k from WTC. All in all, there were 497 athletes who earned prize money from WTC in 2022. Almost all of the top earners also made significant money from other sources, almost always more than half.

Blummenfelt 703 Worlds

Photo: Kristian celebrating his win at 70.3 Worlds in St. George, provided by Ironman.

# Name Gender IM 70.3 WTC Total Share
1 Kristian Blummenfelt M $ 170.000 $ 50.000 $ 220.000 $ 491.700 45%
2 Daniela Ryf F $ 153.000 $ 2.000 $ 155.000 $ 335.000 46%
3 Chelsea Sodaro F $ 140.000 $ 3.250 $ 143.250 $ 278.250 51%
4 Gustav Iden M $ 125.000 $ 125.000 $ 416.755 30%
5 Anne Haug F $ 90.000 $ 2.250 $ 92.250 $ 293.788 31%
6 Sam Laidlow M $ 78.000 $ 78.000 $ 250.000 31%
7 Lucy Charles-Barclay F $ 65.000 $ 12.000 $ 77.000 $ 198.250 39%
8 Lionel Sanders M $ 65.000 $ 10.750 $ 75.750 $ 207.750 36%
9 Katrina Matthews F $ 65.000 $ 7.000 $ 72.000 $ 185.000 39%
9 Skye Moench F $ 71.000 $ 1.000 $ 72.000 $ 158.000 46%
11 Max Neumann M $ 57.500 $ 4.000 $ 61.500 $ 182.658 34%
12 Braden Currie M $ 60.000 $ 60.000 $ 125.877 48%
12 Sarah Crowley F $ 55.000 $ 5.000 $ 60.000 $ 74.930 80%
14 Taylor Knibb F $ 57.500 $ 57.500 $ 270.600 21%
14 Joe Skipper M $ 57.500 $ 57.500 $ 92.500 62%
16 Laura Philipp F $ 50.000 $ 6.500 $ 56.500 $ 216.500 26%
17 Matt Hanson M $ 42.000 $ 12.500 $ 54.500 $ 120.056 45%
18 Magnus Elbaek Ditlev M $ 34.000 $ 18.000 $ 52.000 $ 293.038 18%
19 Daniela Bleymehl F $ 49.000 $ 2.750 $ 51.750 $ 62.792 82%
20 Lisa Norden F $ 45.000 $ 45.000 $ 97.034 46%
21 Emma Pallant-Browne F $ 44.000 $ 44.000 $ 83.212 53%
22 Ruth Astle F $ 39.000 $ 4.750 $ 43.750 $ 60.750 72%
23 Paula Findlay F $ 41.000 $ 41.000 $ 222.000 18%
24 Cody Beals M $ 34.000 $ 5.750 $ 39.750 $ 47.750 83%
25 Leon Chevalier M $ 34.500 $ 3.750 $ 38.250 $ 62.578 61%

Challenge

The top money earners on the Challenge side are typically athletes who focus on the Challenge Family “World Bonus”. This year, Fenella Langridge was the winner on the female side, and she also made enough money in her other Challenge races to become the top money earner. Similar to the WTC side, almost all of the top earners also make significant money from other race organizers. In total, there were 189 athletes who finished in the money ranks in 2022 Challenge and Clash races.

Challenge Roth  pbh2022 Simon Fischer

Photo: Fenella leading on the bike leg at Challenge Roth, provided by Challenge Roth

# Name Gender Challenge Total Share
1 Fenella Langridge F $ 45.567 $ 94.567 48%
2 Sara Perez Sala F $ 44.755 $ 64.755 69%
3 Sam Long M $ 40.410 $ 169.410 24%
4 Magnus Elbaek Ditlev M $ 31.038 $ 293.038 11%
5 Niek Heldoorn M $ 25.627 $ 61.417 42%
6 Lucy Byram F $ 22.648 $ 34.398 66%
7 Anne Haug F $ 21.538 $ 293.788 7%
8 Gustav Iden M $ 18.255 $ 416.755 4%
9 Lucy Buckingham F $ 17.278 $ 23.528 73%
10 Emma Pallant-Browne F $ 15.212 $ 83.212 18%
11 Vincent Luis M $ 15.000 $ 78.000 19%
11 Angelica Olmo F $ 15.000 $ 15.000 100%
13 Thomas Steger M $ 12.778 $ 29.871 43%
14 Jason West M $ 12.500 $ 78.000 16%
15 Ashleigh Gentle F $ 12.368 $ 351.368 4%
16 Patrick Lange M $ 11.519 $ 152.519 8%
17 Richard Varga M $ 10.953 $ 12.953 85%
18 Joao Pereira M $ 10.000 $ 10.000 100%
19 Reinaldo Colucci M $ 9.909 $ 24.409 41%
20 Thomas Bishop M $ 9.104 $ 19.104 48%

Short Course

As in previous years, the top earner of “short course money” had to be successful in both major events, the World Triathlon Series WTCS and SuperLeague. World Champions Flora Duffy and Leo Bergere did not race any SuperLeague events and were overtaken in this money list by SuperLeague winners Georgia Taylor-Brown and Hayden Wilde. In total, 114 athletes made money in these short-course events, most of which made the majority of their money on these distances.

GTB wtcs cagliari

Photo: “GTB” pops a bottle of champagne after her win at WTCS Cagliari 2022, provided by World Triathlon.

# Name Gender WTCS SuperLeague Short Course Total Share
1 Georgia Taylor-Brown F $ 143.000 $ 130.000 $ 273.000 $ 273.000 100%
2 Hayden Wilde M $ 105.000 $ 130.000 $ 235.000 $ 255.000 92%
3 Taylor Spivey F $ 61.200 $ 101.000 $ 162.200 $ 162.200 100%
4 Flora Duffy F $ 157.400 $ 157.400 $ 227.400 69%
5 Leo Bergere M $ 148.100 $ 148.100 $ 151.100 98%
6 Matthew Hauser M $ 44.400 $ 96.000 $ 140.400 $ 140.400 100%
7 Alex Yee M $ 125.900 $ 10.000 $ 135.900 $ 135.900 100%
8 Sophie Coldwell F $ 32.700 $ 71.000 $ 103.700 $ 103.700 100%
9 Beth Potter F $ 49.400 $ 38.000 $ 87.400 $ 87.400 100%
10 Cassandre Beaugrand F $ 55.300 $ 31.500 $ 86.800 $ 86.800 100%
11 Taylor Knibb F $ 73.100 $ 73.100 $ 270.600 27%
12 Vasco Vilaca M $ 26.100 $ 46.000 $ 72.100 $ 72.100 100%
13 Jonathan Brownlee M $ 12.000 $ 54.000 $ 66.000 $ 66.000 100%
14 Jelle Geens M $ 60.700 $ 60.700 $ 60.700 100%
15 Miriam Casillas Garcia F $ 25.700 $ 27.500 $ 53.200 $ 53.200 100%
16 Vincent Luis M $ 51.000 $ 51.000 $ 78.000 65%
17 Verena Steinhauser F $ 15.700 $ 24.000 $ 39.700 $ 39.700 100%
18 Kenji Nener M $ 11.100 $ 27.500 $ 38.600 $ 38.600 100%
19 Laura Lindemann F $ 27.100 $ 8.000 $ 35.100 $ 35.100 100%
20 Emma Lombardi F $ 32.200 $ 32.200 $ 32.200 100%

Ironman Western Australia 2022 – Analyzing Results

IMWACourse Conditions

IM WA is a fast season closer and this year has been no different. Winner Max Neumann missed beating Ali Brownlee’s 2019 course record by one second, as a “consolation prize” he set a new run course record. Matt Burton improved Cam Wurf’s bike record from 2018 by one and a half minutes. On the women’s side, Kylie Simpson missed the run course record by just six seconds, Beth McKenzie’s time from 2014 still stands. 

Kona Qualifiers

IM Western Australia offers two male and two female Kona slot (or wherever the World Championships are going to be). These will go to:

  • Max Neumann and Steven McKenna for the men
    and
  • Sarah Crowley and Els Visser for the women.

The full list of qualifiers can be found here

Male Race Results

Rank Name Nation Swim Bike Run Time Diff to exp. Prize Money
1 Max Neumann AUS 00:48:12 (1) 04:10:11 (2) 02:41:53 (1) 07:45:21 01:49 US$ 7,500
2 Steven McKenna AUS 00:48:14 (2) 04:14:30 (3) 02:43:07 (2) 07:50:48 -15:58 US$ 5,000
3 Matt Burton AUS 00:52:41 (11) 04:05:43 (1) 02:51:25 (5) 07:56:08 -19:38 US$ 3,750
4 Mitchell Kibby AUS 00:50:56 (5) 04:17:11 (5) 02:48:42 (3) 08:01:52 -43:43 US$ 3,000
5 Fraser Walsh AUS 00:51:05 (7) 04:35:19 (18) 02:49:57 (4) 08:22:04 -06:01 US$ 2,000
6 Jack Sosinski AUS 00:50:58 (6) 04:20:52 (7) 03:06:16 (11) 08:23:18 n/a US$ 1,500
7 Levi Hauwert AUS 00:54:45 (13) 04:25:44 (11) 02:59:52 (7) 08:25:21 -48:18 US$ 1,250
8 Lachlan Kerin AUS 00:52:39 (10) 04:15:47 (4) 03:12:57 (13) 08:26:35 -26:20 US$ 1,000
9 Matt Lewis AUS 00:54:47 (16) 04:25:39 (10) 03:03:52 (9) 08:30:05 n/a  
10 Joel Wooldridge AUS 00:52:42 (12) 04:33:10 (16) 03:01:15 (8) 08:32:51 -02:20  
11 Liam Duval AUS 01:00:44 (19) 04:22:04 (8) 03:05:52 (10) 08:34:11 n/a  
12 Harry Young AUS 01:06:57 (22) 04:25:03 (9) 03:11:02 (12) 08:48:12 08:06  
13 Brodie Gardner AUS 00:54:46 (15) 04:31:03 (15) 03:19:00 (14) 08:49:59 01:21  
14 Juuso Manninen FIN 00:51:06 (8) 04:29:58 (14) 03:26:35 (15) 08:52:39 20:55  
15 Zsombor Deak ROM 01:03:52 (21) 04:47:15 (19) 02:56:19 (6) 08:54:21 -22:48  
16 Simon Billeau FRA 00:58:51 (18) 04:28:48 (13) 03:50:47 (17) 09:24:22 35:00  
17 Yann Rocheteau FRA 01:01:23 (20) 05:06:47 (20) 03:37:08 (16) 09:50:51 17:32  
  Blake Kappler AUS 00:52:36 (9) 04:20:30 (6)   DNF    
  Jack Baker AUS 00:54:50 (17) 04:28:20 (12)   DNF    
  Ryan Christian AUS 00:54:45 (13) 04:33:49 (17)   DNF    
  Patrik Nilsson SWE 00:48:20 (3)     DNF    
  Pete Jacobs AUS 00:48:21 (4)     DNF    

Female Race Results

Rank Name Nation Swim Bike Run Time Diff to exp. Prize Money
1 Sarah Crowley AUS 00:54:43 (3) 04:40:08 (2) 03:05:38 (3) 08:46:09 -03:17 US$ 7,500
2 Els Visser NED 00:59:16 (4) 04:44:46 (3) 03:01:49 (2) 08:50:48 -06:52 US$ 5,000
3 Lotte Wilms NED 00:51:47 (1) 04:45:55 (4) 03:08:30 (4) 08:52:52 n/a US$ 3,750
4 Kylie Simpson AUS 01:15:21 (14) 04:36:57 (1) 02:58:23 (1) 08:56:28 -04:05 US$ 3,000
5 Radka Kahlefeldt CZE 00:54:42 (2) 04:49:55 (5) 03:11:51 (5) 09:01:57 05:05 US$ 2,000
6 Meredith Hill AUS 00:59:22 (6) 04:50:29 (6) 03:13:05 (6) 09:09:34 -01:13 US$ 1,500
7 Fiona Moriarty IRL 01:01:09 (10) 04:53:12 (8) 03:19:18 (10) 09:19:31 -21:10 US$ 1,250
8 Shannon Sutton AUS 01:07:43 (12) 04:52:48 (7) 03:13:40 (7) 09:20:47 -51:12 US$ 1,000
9 Laura Brown AUS 01:02:48 (11) 05:02:45 (10) 03:14:44 (8) 09:27:13 -15:26  
10 Moya Johansson AUS 00:59:23 (7) 05:06:35 (11) 03:19:23 (11) 09:30:39 -07:14  
11 Melanie Baumann SUI 01:20:55 (15) 04:59:09 (9) 03:22:30 (12) 09:50:24 -21:22  
12 Sarah Thomas AUS 01:07:47 (13) 05:20:15 (12) 03:19:00 (9) 09:52:32 -03:54  
  Penny Slater AUS 00:59:21 (5)     DNF    
  Dimity-Lee Duke AUS 01:00:21 (8)     DNF    
  Laura Dennis AUS 01:01:08 (9)     DNF    
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